In May 2019, the account hijacking and SIM swapping forum OGusers suffered a data breach. The breach exposed a database backup from December 2018 which was published on a rival hacking forum. There were 161k unique email addresses spread across 113k forum users and other tables in the database. The exposed data also included usernames, IP addresses, private messages and passwords stored as salted MD5 hashes.

Source

In March 2017, the French Flatsharing site known as Appartoo suffered a data breach. The incident exposed an extensive amount of personal information on almost 50k members including email addresses, genders, ages, private messages sent between users of the service and passwords stored as SHA-256 hashes. Appartoo advised that all subscribers were notified of the incident in early 2017.

Source

In January 2018, the children’s gaming site Club Penguin Rewritten (CPRewritten) suffered a data breach (note: CPRewritten is an independent recreation of Disney’s Club Penguin game). The incident exposed almost 1.7 million unique email addresses alongside IP addresses, usernames and passwords stored as bcrypt hashes. When contacted, CPRewritten advised they were aware of the breach and had “contacted affected users”.

Source

In October 2018, the Polish e-commerce website Morele.net suffered a data breach. The incident exposed almost 2.5 million unique email addresses alongside phone numbers, names and passwords stored as md5crypt hashes.

Source

In March 2019, the Indonesian e-commerce website Bukalapak discovered a data breach of the organisation’s backups dating back to October 2017. The incident exposed approximately 13 million unique email addresses alongside IP addresses, names and passwords stored as bcrypt and salted SHA-512 hashes.

Source

In January 2017, the data science website DataCamp suffered a data breach. The incident exposed 760k unique email and IP addresses along with names and passwords stored as bcrypt hashes. In 2019, the data appeared listed for sale on a dark web marketplace (along with several other large breaches) and subsequently began circulating more broadly. The data was provided to HIBP by a source who requested it to be attributed to “BenjaminBlue@exploit.im”.

Source

In September 2018, the German social media website Knuddels suffered a data breach. The incident exposed 808k unique email addresses alongside usernames, real names, the city of the person and their password in plain text. Knuddels was subsequently fined €20k for the breach.

Source

In February 2019, the hacking forum Demon Forums suffered a data breach. The compromise of the vBulletin forum exposed 52k unique email addresses alongside usernames and passwords stored as salted MD5 hashes.

Source

In March 2019, the multiplayer platform game Everybody Edits suffered a data breach. The incident exposed 871k unique email addresses alongside usernames and IP addresses. The data was subsequently distributed online across a collection of files.

Source

In March 2019, a spam operation known as “Intelimost” sent millions of emails appearing to come from people the recipients knew. Security researcher Bob Diachenko found over 3 million unique email addresses in an exposed Elasticsearch database, alongside plain text passwords used to access the victim’s mailbox and customise the spam.

Source