In July 2018, the Belgian social networking site Netlog identified a data breach of their systems dating back to November 2012 (PDF). Although the service was discontinued in 2015, the data breach still impacted 49 million subscribers for whom email addresses and plain text passwords were exposed. The data was provided to HIBP by a source who requested it be attributed to “JimScott.Sec@protonmail.com”.

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In April 2019, the social planning website for managing online invitations Evite identified a data breach of their systems. Upon investigation, they found unauthorised access to a database archive dating back to 2013. The exposed data included a total of 101 million unique email addresses, most belonging to recipients of invitations. Members of the service also had names, phone numbers, physical addresses, dates of birth, genders and passwords stored in plain text exposed. The data was provided to HIBP by a source who requested it be attributed to “JimScott.Sec@protonmail.com”.

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In March 2019, the online gaming website MindJolt suffered a data breach that exposed 28M unique email addresses. Also impacted were names and dates of birth, but no passwords. The data was provided to HIBP by a source who requested it be attributed to “JimScott.Sec@protonmail.com”.

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In June 2019, the library of Vienna (Wiener Büchereien) suffered a data breach. The compromised data included 224k unique email addresses, names, physical addresses, phone numbers and dates of birth. The breached data was subsequently posted to Twitter by the alleged perpetrator of the breach.

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In June 2019, the “Art of Human Hacking” site Social Engineered suffered a data breach. The breach of the XenForo forum was published on a rival hacking forum and included 89k unique email addresses spread across 55k forum users and other tables in the database. The exposed data also included usernames, IP addresses, private messages and passwords stored as salted MD5 hashes.

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In January 2016, the gaming website D3Scene, suffered a data breach. The compromised vBulletin forum exposed 569k million email addresses, IP address, usernames and passwords stored as salted MD5 hashes. The data was provided to HIBP by dehashed.com.

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In April 2018, the self-proclaimed “biggest retro gaming website on earth”, Emupardise, suffered a date breach. The compromised vBulletin forum exposed 1.1 million email addresses, IP address, usernames and passwords stored as salted MD5 hashes. The data was provided to HIBP by dehashed.com.

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In May 2019, the Lawyers Order of Rome suffered a data breach by a group claiming to be Anonymous Italy. Data on tens of thousands of Roman lawyers was taken from the breached system and redistributed online. The data included contact information, email addresses and email messages themselves encompassing tens of thousands of unique email addresses. A total of 42k unique addresses appeared in the breach.

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In May 2019, the account hijacking and SIM swapping forum OGusers suffered a data breach. The breach exposed a database backup from December 2018 which was published on a rival hacking forum. There were 161k unique email addresses spread across 113k forum users and other tables in the database. The exposed data also included usernames, IP addresses, private messages and passwords stored as salted MD5 hashes.

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In March 2017, the French Flatsharing site known as Appartoo suffered a data breach. The incident exposed an extensive amount of personal information on almost 50k members including email addresses, genders, ages, private messages sent between users of the service and passwords stored as SHA-256 hashes. Appartoo advised that all subscribers were notified of the incident in early 2017.

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