In mid-2018, the social ebook subscription service Bookmate was among a raft of sites that were breached and their data then sold in early-2019. The data included almost 4 million unique email addresses alongside names, genders, dates of birth and passwords stored as salted SHA-512 hashes. The data was provided to HIBP by a source who requested it to be attributed to “BenjaminBlue@exploit.im”.

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In mid-2018, the fashion shopping site HauteLook was among a raft of sites that were breached and their data then sold in early-2019. The data included over 28 million unique email addresses alongside names, genders, dates of birth and passwords stored as bcrypt hashes. The data was provided to HIBP by dehashed.com.

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In July 2018, the health and fitness service 8fit suffered a data breach. The data subsequently appeared for sale on a dark web marketplace in February 2019 and included over 15M unique email addresses alongside names, genders, IP addresses and passwords stored as bcrypt hashes. The data was provided to HIBP by dehashed.com.

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In January 2019, the travel and hotel booking site ixigo suffered a data breach. The data appeared for sale on a dark web marketplace the following month and included over 17M unique email addresses alongside names, genders, phone numbers, connections to Facebook profiles and passwords stored as MD5 hashes. The data was provided to HIBP by a source who requested it to be attributed to “BenjaminBlue@exploit.im”.

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In mid-2018, the housing design website Houzz suffered a data breach. The company learned of the incident later that year then disclosed it to impacted members in February 2019. Almost 49 million unique email addresses were in the breach alongside names, IP addresses, geographic locations and either salted hashes of passwords or links to social media profiles used to authenticate to the service. The data was provided to HIBP by dehashed.com.

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In February 2019, the email address validation service verifications.io suffered a data breach. The breach was due to the data being stored in a MongoDB instance left publicly facing without a password and resulted in 763 million unique email addresses being exposed. Many records within the data also included additional personal attributes such as names, phone numbers, IP addresses, dates of birth and genders. No passwords were included in the data. The Verifications.io website went offline during the disclosure process, although an archived copy remains viewable.

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In July 2018, the social bookmarking and sharing service ShareThis suffered a data breach. The incident exposed 41 million unique email addresses alongside names and in some cases, dates of birth and password hashes. In 2019, the data appeared listed for sale on a dark web marketplace (along with several other large breaches) and subsequently began circulating more broadly.

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In December 2018, the video messaging service Dubsmash suffered a data breach. The incident exposed 162 million unique email addresses alongside usernames and PBKDF2 password hashes. In 2019, the data appeared listed for sale on a dark web marketplace (along with several other large breaches) and subsequently began circulating more broadly. The data was provided to HIBP by a source who requested it to be attributed to “BenjaminBlue@exploit.im”.

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In February 2018, the diet and exercise service MyFitnessPal suffered a data breach. The incident exposed 144 million unique email addresses alongside usernames, IP addresses and passwords stored as SHA-1 and bcrypt hashes (the former for earlier accounts, the latter for newer accounts). In 2019, the data appeared listed for sale on a dark web marketplace (along with several other large breaches) and subsequently began circulating more broadly. The data was provided to HIBP by a source who requested it to be attributed to “BenjaminBlue@exploit.im”.

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In October 2017, the genealogy website MyHeritage suffered a data breach. The incident was reported 7 months later after a security researcher discovered the data and contacted MyHeritage. In total, more than 92M customer records were exposed and included email addresses and salted SHA-1 password hashes. In 2019, the data appeared listed for sale on a dark web marketplace (along with several other large breaches) and subsequently began circulating more broadly. The data was provided to HIBP by a source who requested it be attributed to “BenjaminBlue@exploit.im”.

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